X Marks the Spot: Where to Put Contact Forms

Conversions, customers and contact forms go hand in hand (in hand). The worst thing you can do is to not show any contact information all. The next worst thing is to put your contact form in a bad spot that hinders user experience.

When it comes to contact forms, you have plenty of options and can even choose a combination:

Pop-ups: These can either be really effective or really annoying. Barging in on a visitor who has just landed is extremely distracting. It might even encourage them to leave. On the other hand, there are different options to choose from… such as, contact forms (or third party live chat windows) that slowly fade into the screen after a visitor has been on the page for X amount of time.

The advantage of this is that you can even review Analytics for time spent on page and adjust when the contact form pops up to retain more visitors.

Header: Having a contact form at the top of the page is helpful because it’s the most logical place people will look. At the same time, it is also taking up space for something else that could be more important. Make sure to keep in mind what language you use, as it’s one of the first things visitors will see if it’s at the top. (“Contact Us”, “Submit”, “Send” etc.)

Sidebar: Contact forms in this space are often smaller than in the header or on a page of its own. This is perfect for a simple, short contact form that requires minimal information. Perhaps, it’s just a small form for a Newsletter Signup or to request a free download. Even though these aren’t technically contact forms, they’re still helpful ways to provide useful information to relevant visitors.

Footer: Contact forms at the bottom of the page often serve as a reminder to visitors to make contact before leaving. It can be helpful or overly aggressive and cluttered, depending on your design. Like the sidebar contact form, make sure to keep it short and sweet if you’re just trying to capture some of those straying visitors.

Dropdown menus: Sometimes, contact (or evaluation) forms are rather lengthy or require space for open ended questions. In this case, you’ll want to to keep the form on a page of its own. It’s still important to have this information in an easy-to-find place in your drop down menu. You can also use a short footer or sidebar contact form if you still include something that’s visible on every single page.

There’s no one “best” place to put your contact form. You can test different forms on similar pages, use eye tracking studies, or even ask for feedback to find out what your customers like. What’s your personal preference on contact pages? Feel free to contact us if you have any questions about forms, conversions or SEO friendly web design.

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