The Increasing Worth of a Facebook Fan

In 2010, the average worth of a Facebook fan was valued to be at $136.38, according to a study by Syncapse. This week, the company released another study which revealed that the average Fan is worth $174… and that price is climbing!

Spending and Making Money
The study also shows that in 2012, Facebook made about $5.089 billion in revenue, which comes out to about $5.32 per user. That revenue is coming from businesses, who are finding it to be increasingly profitable to their business and brand to invest in engagement through Facebook.

Study Overview
Brands included in this year’s study were: BMW, Xbox, Disney, Victoria’s Secret, McDonald’s, Starbucks, Walmart and more. So just how do you measure the worth of a Fan? There are different factors that were accounted for including: product spending, loyalty, propensity to recommend, media value, acquisition cost and brand affinity.

Here are some findings:

– Fans are 80% more likely than non-Fans to be “brand users”
– Fans spend more than non-Fans. 43% to be exact, even though they may not necessarily have a higher income.

– Fans are 18% more satisfied with their brands than are non-Fan users.
– Fans 11% more likely to continue using the brands than are non-Fan users.
– On average, 85% of Facebook Fans are likely to recommend the brand compared to 60% of non-Fans.

With social media marketing become more important and ROI becoming more transparent, it’s crucial for small business to make the most of their online campaigns.

Read more by downloading the study here. And continue the conversation by joining us on Facebook!

Discovering Pinterest’s New Design

Pinterest’s new look will roll out to all users soon, but you can get a sneak peak now.

The whole point of this redesign is to make it easier for users to discover new things. This means:
1) showcasing pins from the same board (without having to leave the page) and
2) making it easier to find pins from the same site/source

Paired with a cleaner design, indefinite scrolling, bigger pins and simpler navigation, Pinterest is a content curator’s dream. All these elements will also help a business strengthen their branding and better engage with customers.

Pinterest once came out of nowhere and its popularity exploded. It’s interesting to see how new features evolve and what direction the site will take. Did I mention that there’s Web Analytics for businesses? Take a look and check out more here.

NPR Study: Best Local Stories for Facebook Engagement

Facebook engagement is important, especially around the holidays! Click on the picture above and see what NPR Digital services found in their experiment. It’s pretty self explanatory but the main point is that these wildly engaging stories often pull at the heart strings and put people in a good mood.

Nowadays, Facebook success is measured by more than just Likes. Thousands of Likes and zero engagement isn’t helpful for your business or customers. Instead of constantly self-promoting, it’s leaning towards a slightly different way to engage with fans: talk about subjects that are closely related to your brand.

Read more here:
5 Ways to Improve Your Facebook Engagement
Page publishing that drives engagement
The Real Value of Facebook Isn’t Your Likes or Fans
3 Ways To Get More Facebook Engagement By Using Photos

Share your favorite types of Facebook content and join us here!

The Power of Social Media in the 2012 Summer Olympics

Last night’s Summer Olympics closing ceremony was a wonderful way to close out the historic sporting events. The United States had the most wins with a total of 104 medals – while China and Great Britain were close behind.

Throughout the games and even throughout the closing ceremony, it was hard to escape the power of social media. Let’s take a look at some ways this is changing the way the games are presented and watched nowadays:

Consumption – There’s no doubt about it, fans and athletes alike love social media. It’s estimated that there were over 50 million tweets related to the Olympics. Rabid Ryan Lochte fans celebrated with the signature #JEAH hashtag, while gymnast Gabby Douglas gained over half a million new Twitter followers in just under 2 weeks. This year’s games were unlike any other because social media really has provided a channel for fans all over the world to be more connected to each other and their favorite athletes. Wonder if ancient Greek athletes could ever imagine something like this!

Criticism – NBC was continuously bashed throughout the Olympics for their lackluster coverage of events. Check out the #NBCfail hashtag to see a sample of what fans are saying. Early on, Twitter suspended (and quickly unsuspended) the account of a journalist that tweeted the “private” email address of a network executive and urged fans to email him. Fans have proven to be extremely vocal and big networks can now instantaneously see what consumers are criticizing them for.

Consequences – A Greek and Swiss athlete were suspended from their respective teams for racist tweets. Imagine all the hard work and not being able to participate because of a tasteless remark. Of course, these remarks and “jokes” go against everything that the Olympic spirit stands for. The debate is whether athletes should be suspended for such behavior or if social media usage should be restricted/controlled in the first place. Racism and ignorance has and will always exist. But the immediacy of social media is changing how we see it because it makes that hatred more tangible and permanent.

The next Summer Olympics is set to be held in Rio de Janeiro in 2016. Until then social media consumption will only grow. Companies should to keep their eyes on what their next move is in order to effectively capitalize on all the potential. And athletes must think more carefully to what they broadcast to the world. The question is, what will they learn until then?